Category Archives: Kentucky

So why do I sneeze so much?

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A couple of weeks ago one of my Facebook friends, J Paul Hawthorne of GeneaSpy blog, posted an Excel spreadsheet that went viral on social media. In his spreadsheet he listed where 5 generations of his family were born. I thought what a wonderful idea it was so I joined in on the fun. It wasn’t until a day ago I realized what a wonderful thing to post to this blog.

So here it is:

My Five Generation Custom Chart JPH v2 Birth Places

I’m the first one on the left. My parents are the next row and so on. SOOOO, seeing this I have one question……..why am I so allergic to Kentucky’s native flora? I mean my ancestors have lived, worked and worshiped in this state for over 200 years! Shouldn’t that make MY body more accustomed to the native pollen in this state?

Well anyway it is interesting to see all of the Kentucky listed on the chart. I guess to get a little color variation I could list the different counties and make them different colors.

What would your chart look like?

Hope you enjoyed, glad you stopped by and please come back again 😉

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Treasure Chest Thursday -Granny M’s Memory Bk pt14

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OK, so I accidentally forgot to write a post the last two weeks, but I promise this week’s posting will totally makeup for it. These are the newspaper clippings found between pages 41 and 42 of the memory book that was my grand and great-grand mothers. Sorry for the blurry image I must have moved when I scanned it. 😛

The first clipping is midway down the page on the left and tells us this:

“Retired Farmer Dies – Special to the Courier-Journal
Edmonton, Ky., Dec 3 – Robert Dewett Knight, 59 Edmonton retired farmer, died of a hear attach at 4:30 a.m. today at his home after a long illness. Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Phoebe Knight; two daughters, Mrs. Bill Cooksey, Edmonton, and Mrs. James Cooksey, Louisville; two brothers, Paul and Rufus Knight, East Fork, and three sisters, Mrs. Jim Shirley and Mrs. Will Shirley, Edmonton, and Miss Sallie M. Knight, Glasgow. Funeral will be at 2 p.m. Wednesday in Butler Funeral home.”

Seems like a lot of sisters marrying men with the same last name. Wonder if they were brothers marrying sisters? Anyway, on to the next clipping. It tells us:

“Ex-Farmer Dies at 85 – Special to the Courier-Journal
Greensburg, Ky., Dec 3. – William Dave Young, 85, retired farmer, died this afternoon at his home in the Little Barren community after a short illness. He had served for several years as a deacon of Little Barren Separate Baptist Church.
He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Bird Martin Young; two daughters, Mrs. Hattie Jones, Greensburg, and Mrs. Lucy Houk, Pierce; two sons, Harry Young, Greensburg, and Willie Young, Little Barren; 19 grandchildren, and 33 great-grandchildren.
The funeral will be at 1:30 a.m. Wednesday at Little Barren Church. The body is at Cowherd & Parrott Funeral Home here.”

According to the Kentucky Death Index 1911-2000 found at Ancestry.com, William D Young died in Green County, Kentucky on 3 Dec 1956 at the age of 85.

Now to the best clipping:

“Married Three Years, Parents, Find They’re Brother, Sister
Hereford, England, Feb. 18 – (AP) – Mr. and Mrs. Geoffrey Hughes have discovered after three years of marriage and two children that they are brother and sister. Already separated by the grim knowledge, they are working on an annulment.
The 24-year-old mother told reporters today the tragedy began in 1934 when her parents died and she and her brother, two years older, were sent to an orphanage.
Margaret was soon adopted by a family named Stanham and took their name. As Margaret Stanham she met young Geoffrey Hughes in 1948. Three years later they were married.
Their first child, Robert, is no 2 and their youngest, Michael is five months old.
“Soon after Michael’s birth,” Margaret said, “a woman told me my real name was Hughes and that Geoffrey is my brother. I went at once to the registrar of births. He looked up the records and to my horror I found that the woman was right.
“Geoffrey and I parted immediately,” she added. “He was heartbroken. He was devoted to the children and we were very happy. I do not know where he is now.
“I do not know what to do but even if I have to work night and day I will never be parted from my children.
Registrar W. G. Bacon confirmed Margaret’s story. He described the marriage as a “one in a million chance.”
Mrs. Hughes said she did not list her antecedents at the time of her marriage because she was an orphan and did not even know her actual name.
Hughes works as a traveling lumberjack. He has held several different jobs since leaving the Royal Air Force.
Stanham died in 1950 and Mrs. Stanham soon afterward. The home Margaret was raised in was an ordinary middle class British family.
The Hereford County Council will hold an inquiry into the case, which is believed to have first reached the public and press through a chatty neighbor.
Another neighbor said last night “a friend” had told her how “very much alike” the Hughes looked.”

WOW! What else can you say? I knew I had read something like this in the news no too long ago so I Googled the terms: couple find out they are related. Should be an interesting set of of hits.

Over 1 million hits….WHAT! Now, of course, there are duplicates and other hits that don’t really match this search verbatim, but a large number of the hits do belong. THIS. IS. INSANE!

In trying to find out from what year this clipping comes, I turned to our old friend Google and actually found another paper that this article had ran: the Prescott Evening Courier on 18 Feb 1955. If you want to see it, the link is: http://ow.ly/bzcF1

Hope you enjoyed, glad you stopped by and please come back again 😉
 

Treasure Chest Thursday -Granny M’s Memory Bk pt13

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If you’ve hung with me this long, I’m guessing that the memory book doesn’t need much of an introduction, so here goes.

The first clipping on the left reads as follows:

“Eldene Bennett Passes at the age of Sixteen
Earth was saddened, Heaven rejoiced, and Mother was made glad in the early hours of December 23, 1956 when Eldene, 16 year old daughter of Rev. Homer Bennett and the late Blanche Yates Bennett, smiled away her pain, and donned a robe of peacefulness, happiness and rest.
Surviving, besides her father, are five sisters, and four brothers, Sharon, Jimmy, Harold, Donnie, Florence, Betty, and Linda, at home, Odell, of Edmonton, Lois Bennett, and Mrs. J. W. Fudge, of Chicago, Ill.; one grandmother, Mrs. Emma Bennett, three nieces, several uncles, aunts, cousins, and friends whose hearts were saddened because of her going.
Eldene remembers her Creator and gave Him her life at the age of 12, and became a member of the Dripping Spring Baptist Church. She was a member of Metcalfe County High School Junior class, and held in high esteem by all her classmates.
When her spirit took its flight to the unseen world of Heaven, there was left behind, memories that even time itself cannot take away.
Eldene was loved by all who knew her, and the kindness, gentleness, and patience with which she met death were characteristic of the way she lived.
Though her days with those she loved best were suddenly brought to an early end, she will always live in the hearts of those who knew and loved her. And as each of those who remain, follow after her, no doutb{sic}, she will be first to welcome them to her new home.
Pallbearers and flower girls for the funeral were members of the Metcalfe County High Junior Class.”

Next clipping looks like it came from the Courier-Journal, a Louisville newspaper.

“Eldene Bennett, 16, Dies at Knob Lick
Edmonton, Ky., Dec 23 – Miss Eldene Bennett, 16, died today at her home on Knob Lick Route 1. She had been ill five months.
Survivors include her father, the Rev. Homer Bennett; six sisters, Mrs. Valeria Fudge, Chicago, and Misses Lois, Florence, Betty, Linda, and Sharon Bennett, all of Knob Lick, and four brothers, Donnie, Harold, and James Bennett, all of Knob Lick, and Odell Bennett, Edmonton.
The funeral will be at 1 p.m. Tuesday at Dripping Springs Church.”

The next clipping over states:

“Retired Mail Carrier, William T Kinser, Dies
Edmongton, Ky., Dec. 23 – William T. Kinser, 70, died tonight at his home in Knob Lick. A retired mail carrier, he had taught school and farmed. A daughter, Miss Banks Kinser, Knob Lick, survives.
The funeral will be at 2 p.m. tomorrow at Knob Lick Church. Burial will be in Hiseville Cemetery.”

I’m not sure of the connection between my family and the subject of these clippings, unless my mother or some of her siblings went to school with Eldene’s siblings and that Mr Kinser was their mail carrier. I will have to ask my mother the next time I get to talk to her about the connection.

Hope you enjoyed, glad you stopped by and please come back again 😉
 

Mappy Monday – Oh the places he’s lived!

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When I started doing research, my dad was still alive and wanted to help, so he would do what he felt comfortable doing. Some of which were: visiting with relatives and talking to them about the family, asking around for copies of family pictures, and going with his father to old home places to take pictures.

One time after spending the weekend with his father, dad came back home and showed me the map below.

This is a map of Larue County, Kentucky that dad had gotten from the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet booth at the Kentucky State Fair.

Dad had consulted with his father and had taken the time to mark all the different places that his parents had lived since their marriage in 1935. The only place that dad left off of this map was the Illinois farm where my grandparents were living when my dad was born in 1938. They lived on that farm until 1941 when they moved back to Larue County to live on the “Spratt farm”, as shown on the above map.

The list of names on the map is the name of the owner of the farm from whom my grandparents rented while living and farming on that property. Years later when my grandparents referred to a certain place, they would call the farm “The Ragland place”, “The Ragsdell place”, etc. Including the Illinois farm, they lived on 12 different farms or house from 1935 until 1958, when they had a house built and “settled down.”

The dots on the map have the name of the farm and can be matched with the farms name in the list and that will tell the year(s) they lived there.

I’ve heard my grandmother talk about the many moves and say she had left beautiful “antiques” behind, because they didn’t have enough room in the truck that was moving them.

Hope you enjoyed, glad you stopped by and please come back again 😉

Treasure Chest Thursday – Granny M’s Memory Bk pt12

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Well, I took off last week because of going to the National Genealogical Society Conference in Cincinnati, Oh.

So now, back to the Memory Book that my grandmother & great-grandmother’s created. This week’s page is an extra sheet of paper that was stuck between two pages.

“Nov 2 – 1st big snow. 15 inches in Glasgow
Oct 29 Earl Munday had operation.
Nov 12, James Earl got married
Nov 14, James Earl & bride came to Eugene’s
Nov 15, they came to my house.
Nov 17 I went with them to L-ville
They visited Gilbert’s Gordon’s & Joseph’s
Nov 15, Aunt Gracie went to Texas
Nov 28 snowed again
Nov 29 Dale had chickenpox
Dec 6, I had my hair fix. Dec 7, I had my picture taken,
Dec 9, I went to William & Madolyn with Rev & Mrs Oliver. Dec 16 W. L brought me home.”

Well isn’t this exciting: Snow, marriage, chickenpox and hair fixing! I don’t know how she managed.

Anyhow, now for a little more information on the people. James Earl is James Earl Munday, son of the above named Earl and nephew to my grandmother. Aunt Gracie is really her sister, Gracie DeSpain Towne. Dale is her grandson, Henry Dale Robertson, Jr. Oh yeah and L-ville is Louisville, Kentucky, where Gilbert, Gordon and Joseph all lived at the time.

I can’t figure out the year that this happened, but I have the marriage date of James Earl and his wife in some of my records that I don’t have in my database yet. 😦  But I think I remember my mother telling me that James Earl came for a visit (you know it wasn’t an everyday occurrence when out of town relatives came for a visit) in the late 60’s, so I’ll go with that for now.

Hope you enjoyed, glad you stopped by and please come back again 😉